Friday, December 15, 2017

Book Trailer Friday [@randomhousekids @Marie_Lu]

This week's book trailer pick is for the second DC Icons novel, Batman: Nightwalker by Marie Lu. It will be published by Random House Books for Young Readers on January 2nd. Here's the trailer:




about Batman: Nightwalker (DC Icons #2):

Before he was Batman, he was Bruce Wayne. A reckless boy willing to break the rules for a girl who may be his worst enemy.

The Nightwalkers are terrorizing Gotham City, and Bruce Wayne is next on their list.

One by one, the city's elites are being executed as their mansions' security systems turn against them, trapping them like prey. Meanwhile, Bruce is turning eighteen and about to inherit his family's fortune, not to mention the keys to Wayne Enterprises and all the tech gadgetry his heart could ever desire. But after a run-in with the police, he's forced to do community service at Arkham Asylum, the infamous prison that holds the city's most brutal criminals.

Madeleine Wallace is a brilliant killer . . . and Bruce's only hope.


In Arkham, Bruce meets Madeleine, a brilliant girl with ties to the Nightwalkers. What is she hiding? And why will she speak only to Bruce? Madeleine is the mystery Bruce must unravel. But is he getting her to divulge her secrets, or is he feeding her the information she needs to bring Gotham City to its knees? Bruce will walk the dark line between trust and betrayal as the Nightwalkers circle closer.



Random House Books for Young Readers // January 02, 2018 // 272 pages // DC Icons #2 // Goodreads // Book Depository // Amazon

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Books of 2017


This week's Ten:
Top 10 11 Books of 2017
(+ 1 2016 Book)


The 2016 books is one I read at the end of 2016, but I didn't wan it to miss out on both the 2016 and 2017 lists, so I'm including it anyway.. Then, I have eleven 2017 books not ten because I just couldn't knock one off the list!



This Body Won't Break (#1) by Lea McKee
(This Body Won't Break is currently free for Kindle)

This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada

Girls Made of Snow & Glass by Melissa Bashardousht

 Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner

The Witchfinder's Sister by Beth Underdown

A List of Cages by Robin Roe

Not Now, Not Ever by Lily Anderson

The Girl Who Saved Christmas (Christmas #2) by Matt Haig

What to Say Next by Julie Buxbaum

Artemis by Andy Weir

Aftercare Instructions by Bonnie Pipkin


the 2016 Book:


The Bone Sparrow by Zana Fraillon




Please leave a comment and let me know your top books of 2017 - and/or any recommendations you have based on my picks!

Friday, December 8, 2017

Book Trailer Friday [@Sara__Holland @epicreads @harperteen]

This week the trailer I chose is for Everless (#1) by Sara Holland:


about Everless:

In the kingdom of Sempera, time is currency—extracted from blood, bound to iron, and consumed to add time to one’s own lifespan. The rich aristocracy, like the Gerlings, tax the poor to the hilt, extending their own lives by centuries.

No one resents the Gerlings more than Jules Ember. A decade ago, she and her father were servants at Everless, the Gerlings’ palatial estate, until a fateful accident forced them to flee in the dead of night. When Jules discovers that her father is dying, she knows that she must return to Everless to earn more time for him before she loses him forever.

But going back to Everless brings more danger—and temptation—than Jules could have ever imagined. Soon she’s caught in a tangle of violent secrets and finds her heart torn between two people she thought she’d never see again. Her decisions have the power to change her fate—and the fate of time itself.




January 02, 2018 // HarperTeen // 336 pages // Goodreads // Book Depository // Amazon

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Berserker ~ Emmy Laybourne (earc) review [@EmmyLaybourne @FeiwelFriends @FierceReads]

Berserker (#1)
Feiwel & Friends
October 10, 2017
352 pages
add to Goodreads/buy form Book Depository/or Amazon


Are Hanne's powers a gift from the old Norse gods, or a curse?

Her brother Stieg swears their powers are a gift from the old gods, but Hanne Hemstad knows she is truly cursed. It's not Stieg's fault that their father is dead, their mother has left, and their brother Knut has been accused of a crime he didn't commit.

No, the fault lies with Hanne and her inability to control her murderous "gift"--she is a Berserker. When someone she loves is threatened, she flies into a killing state. The siblings must leave Norway for the American frontier or risk being brought to justice.

Aided by a young cowboy who agrees to be their guide, Hanne and her siblings use their powers to survive the perilous trail, where blizzards, wild animals, and vicious bounty hunters await.

Will they be able to reach their uncle, the one man Hanne believes may be able to teach her how to control her drive to kill? With Berserker, Emmy Laybourne, the author of Monument 14, presents her vision of an American west studded with Viking glory.

Emmy Laybourne's Berserker does a great job blending the story of a family immigrating to America in the 19th century. This was one of the first books I have read that featured any kind of Norse mythology and I liked that it wasn't so much about gods and goddesses but about what they might have given to people, to mortals.

How we are introduced to Hanne and learn of her 'gifts' was nicely done. We are able to see what she can do and to see her relationships with her family before we get the facts. I liked her being someone you probably already connected with before you learn how she can kill.

The danger the siblings face and how it was compounded by Hanne's gifts added tension to the read ad made it more exciting. It was not so simple as them leaving Norway, finding somewhere to stat a new life and that being that. As they tried to adjust to a new land and life, come to terms with what had happened and who they were, we really did learn a lot about the characters.

The bleaker things became, the more they had to use their abilities but also the more of a threat using those abilities might pose.  Berserker really does a fantastic job with its sibling relationships, with four young people coming to a brand new country and to a whole new life, and forcing its characters to deal with both seemingly magical abilities and very human emotions.

Emmy Laybourne's Monument 14 book and series were fun and fast paced, but her new novel delves more into the characters lives and emotions and feels a bit more. . . grown up, maybe. Berserker is  a creative, sometimes tension filled read that expertly combines Norse mythology, ancient abilities and the human lives of those affect.







digital review copy received from publisher, via NetGalley

Waiting On Wednesday [@juliathrillers @randomhouse]

Waiting On Wednesday is hosted by Breaking the Spine

My pick for this week:



PAPER GHOSTS by Julia Heaberlin

A gripping thriller about a man who may or may not have dementia—and who may or may not be a serial killer—from a master of twists and turns, in the tradition of Laura Lippman and Gillian Flynn

An obsessive young woman has been waiting half her life—since she was twelve years old—for this moment. She has planned. Researched. Trained. Imagined every scenario. Now she is almost certain the man who kidnapped and murdered her sister sits in the passenger seat beside her.

Carl Louis Feldman is a documentary photographer. The young woman claims to be his long-lost daughter. He doesn’t believe her. He claims no memory of murdering girls across Texas, in a string of places where he shot eerie pictures. She doesn’t believe him.

Determined to find the truth, she lures him out of a halfway house and proposes a dangerous idea: a ten-day road trip, just the two of them, to examine cold cases linked to his haunting photographs.

Is he a liar or a broken old man? Is he a pathological con artist? Or is she? Julia Heaberlin once again swerves the serial killer genre in a new direction. With taut, captivating prose, Heaberlin deftly explores the ghosts that live in our minds—and the ones that stare back from photographs. You won’t see the final, terrifying twist spinning your way until the very last mile.



published May 15th by Ballantine Books

add to your Goodreads shelf // pre-order from Book Depo // or Amazon


Why?

Is he a liar or a broken old man? Is he a pathological con artist? Or is she?

I love mysteries where, from the beginning, you cannot really be sure of anything - even if the 'bad guy' is really a bad guy after all. Is it the character we are supposed to sympathize with who is really the truly bad one - even worse than whomever is set up as the 'bad guy'? Thrillers like this can take readers on a confusing, surprising, shocking, emotional but (hopefully) ultimately incredibly rewarding ride.

I really look forward to reading Paper Ghosts and discovering both his secrets and hers . . . and maybe even some of the truth, too.



That's my pick for this week, what's yours? Tell me in the comments and/or link me to your own post!

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Book Settings to Visit


This week's Ten:
10 Books Settings I Want to Visit


This whole list needs to come with a caveat, though, (it started being for this book then that book then, oh wait, this one, too until it was nearly all of them so instead it's for the list as a whole): I mean parts/places/times where I would not die. Whether it's through some sort of magical, protection bubble or just a fail-safe, definite, not-at-all-able-to-go-wrong escape plan . . . By whatever means I would want to visit these settings if I wouldn't be in mortal danger.



Warcross (#1) by Marie Lu
(probably Tokyo, specifically)



Blacksouls (#2) by Nicole Castroman



This Mortal Coil (#1) by Emily Suvada




These Broken Stars (Starbound #1) by Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner



This Shattered World (Starbound #2) by Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner



A Drop of Night by Stefan Bachmann



Illuminae (#1) by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff



Artemis by Andy Weir



Daughter of the Pirate King (#1) by Tricia Levenseller



Mistletoe & Mr Right by Lyla Payne


Please leave a comment and let me know what book settings you would most want to visit!

Monday, December 4, 2017

Every Heart a Doorway ~ Seanan McGuire review [@torbooks]

Every Heart a Doorway (Wayward Children #1)
Tor.com
April 05, 2016
173 pages
add to Goodreads/buy from Book Depository/or Amazon

Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children
No Solicitations
No Visitors
No Quests

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions; slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere... else.

But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she’s back. The things she’s experienced... they change a person. The children under Miss West’s care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world.

But Nancy’s arrival marks a change at the Home. There’s a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it’s up to Nancy and her new-found schoolmates to get to the heart of the matter.

No matter the cost.

"Call it irony, if you like, but we spend so much time waiting for our boys to stray that they never have the opportunity. We notice the silence of men. We depend upon the silence of women."  (pg 59)

Every Heart a Doorway is a brilliant fantasy tale. I loved that the story focuses on what happens after: after children disappear from their homes, through magical doorways, and spend however long in these magical worlds. After they come home, back to the normal, non-magical world.

It is both unexpected and wonderful that Nancy, Sumi and the others are not thrilled to be back in the real world. They aren't 'rescued' now that they're home, in fact, they want to go back.

Why they left in the first place, where they each went, how they feel about being back (home first, now at Eleanor's school) and their hopes for the future have definite similarities but it's the amazing differences that make the story such fun. Sumi is so very different from Nancy who's so very different from Jack, etc. and it manages to feel like a school social environment while also involving the Hals of the Dead, mad scientists, vampires, skeletons, and the Countess of Candy Floss. It is both fantastically magical and wonderfully realistic.

I both adored and appreciated the diversity of Every Heart a Doorway's characters. When why they were at the school/home was factored in, their eccentricities, their identities (however you want to interpret the word), really all of who they each were made even more sense. With such a small group of characters, the story was that much better for each of them having a strong personality and for their differences. It also allows you, once something horrible happens, to see how many of those 'differences' don't matter and how similar we all are.

Every Heart a Doorway manages to be great fantasy and a great mystery and have great characters who offer some important, smart, thoughtful insights. Once you read this, you'll want Down Among the Sticks and Bones to start reading right way (Book 3, Beneath the Sugar Sky, is out in January).










Friday, December 1, 2017

This Mortal Coil ~ Emily Suvada review [@emilysuvada @simonteen]

This Mortal Coil (#1)
Simon Pulse
November 07, 2017
412 pages
add to Goodreads/buy from Book Depository/or Amazon


Catarina Agatta is a hacker. She can cripple mainframes and crash through firewalls, but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people are implanted with technology to recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies in any way they want. And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius.

That’s no surprise, since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus, leaving Cat to survive the last two years on her own.

When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.

Now Cat must decide who she can trust: The soldier with secrets of his own? The father who made her promise to hide from Cartaxus at all costs? In a world where nature itself can be rewritten, how much can she even trust herself?

It has been a long, long time since i was so wonderfully, pleasantly surprised by a book as I was with This Mortal Coil. When I first saw the book cover online it immediately drew me to it (and I like it even more now, knowing what it represents). For whatever reason, I wasn't sure I wanted to read it, though . . . I have absolutely no idea why now.

Emily Suvada's debut novel gives readers one of the creepiest, most unsettling portraits of a near future dystopia.  Maybe one of the easiest to imagine actually happening, too.

The way that people can use apps to modify their bodies, to heal injuries, to treat and defeat illnesses is definitely very science fiction, but it's also presented in such a way that you can believe it - and understand both the how and the why. I thoroughly enjoyed the mix of coding and science in This Mortal Coil, it elevated what could have been this inconceivable, implausible future and made it something real.

I loved Catarina's character, from what she had to do, alone in the cabin for so long, to survive the outbreak to why she was limited in the apps she could run and what it meant for her, her to coding abilities and her relationships. Through her we learn a lot about Hydra, about how people can modify themselves with code and apps, about Cartaxus and who now is in charge of society. We also get some fantastic questions and things to try to unravel.

Just when things seemed to be concluding, something huge and significant would be revealed that was both startling and surprising and something you couldn't believe you didn't see coming. It was all brilliant

As Amie Kaufman, co-author of Illuminae  and the Starbound Series said, "This Mortal Coil redefines 'unputdownable.' A thrilling, exhilarating read that's crackling with intelligence. Compelling characters and and incredible twists come together perfectly—I loved this book. This is brilliant science fiction.."

This is what I want from a scifi, dystopian, near future read. ThisThis Mortal Coil was a fantastic debut and I am very, very much looking forward to Book 2!



Book Trailer Friday [@emilysuvada @simonteen @PenguinBooksSA]

This week the trailer I picked isn't for a new or upcoming release, but it is for the book I'm reviewing in just a few minutes, This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada:


about This Mortal Coil:


Catarina Agatta is a hacker. She can cripple mainframes and crash through firewalls, but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people are implanted with technology to recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies in any way they want. And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius.

That’s no surprise, since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus, leaving Cat to survive the last two years on her own.

When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.

Now Cat must decide who she can trust: The soldier with secrets of his own? The father who made her promise to hide from Cartaxus at all costs? In a world where nature itself can be rewritten, how much can she even trust herself?



Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Waiting On Wednesday [@asiegemundbroka @wibbs_ink @puffinbooks]

Waiting On Wednesday is hosted by Breaking the Spine

My pick for this week:



ALWAYS NEVER YOURS by Emily Wibberley & Austin Siegemund-Broka

Megan Harper is the girl before. All her exes find their one true love right after dating her. It’s not a curse or anything, it’s just the way things are, and Megan refuses to waste time feeling sorry for herself. Instead, she focuses on pursuing her next fling, directing theatre, and fulfilling her dream school’s acting requirement in the smallest role possible.

But her plans quickly crumble when she’s cast as none other than Juliet–yes, that Juliet–in her high school’s production. It’s a nightmare. No–a disaster. Megan’s not an actress and she’s certainly not a Juliet. Then she meets Owen Okita, an aspiring playwright who agrees to help Megan catch the eye of a sexy stagehand in exchange for help writing his new script.

Between rehearsals and contending with her divided family, Megan begins to notice Owen–thoughtful, unconventional, and utterly unlike her exes, and wonders: shouldn’t a girl get to play the lead in her own love story?



published May 22nd by Speak

add to your Goodreads shelf // pre-order from Book Depo // or Amazon


Why?

My reasoning for this one's pretty simple: it sounds cute and fun. Plus, I don't thin  I have read an YA contemporary romance lately, I have been reading a lot more fantasy and scifi and  darker books lately; the change of pace (and tone) sounds appealing.

(Also: Emily Wibberley's Goodreads bio mentions Buffy, so . . .)

That's my pick for this week, what's yours? Tell me in the comments and/or link me to your own post!

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Winter TBR


This week's Ten:
10  Books on My Winter TBR

Here are the ten books being published in December, January, or February that I am most looking forward to reading:


Daughter of the Siren Queen (#2) by Tricia Levenseller
 Goodreads

A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena

Into the Black Nowhere (UNSUB #2) by Meg Gardiner

Tarnished City (Dark Gifts #2) by Vic James


The Cruel Prince (#1) by Holly Black

Prince in Disguise by Stephanie Kate Strohm

Beneath the Sugar Sky (Wayward Children #3) by Seanan McGuire

Busted by Gina Ciocca

And She Was by Jessica Verdi

American Heart by Laura Moriarty

Love & Other Train Wrecks by Leah Konen





Please leave a comment and let me know what books are on your Winter TBR list!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...